All posts filed under: Castle

The four step Market Cross

Surrounded by beautiful North Dorset countryside, Sturminster Newton lies in the heart of Blackmore Vale.

The town’s name reflects two features of the town: the River Stour, and the Minster. The town, which dates from before the Domesday Book, grew as a market for local agricultural products, especially dairy products. Henry III granted the town a charter for a market in 1219. The market, which closed in 1998 was once […]

Chester Cathedral Rob Farrow

Chester in Cheshire steeped in architecture and archaeology

The Romans founded Chester in the C1st AD. The city was the fortress of the 20th Legion. There are extensive Roman walls of local red sandstone. Outside the walls are the remains of the largest Roman amphitheatre in Britain. Storyhouse Today’s theatre lovers can also enjoy an indoor experience at Chester’s Storyhouse. The recently opened […]

Hertford War Memorial by-Chris-Reynolds on geograph-3874923-
Hertford War Memorial by-Chris-Reynolds on geograph-3874923-

Hertford, on the River Lee, once a Saxon stronghold on the boundary between Saxon and Danish England

King Edgar established Hertfordshire with Hertford as its County town. The town is now a blend of old and new and set in delightful countryside. The War Memorial, dating from November 1921, has a bronze stag standing on a Portland stone plinth. Some of Henry II’s walls of 1173 have survived, James I demolished the […]

Penglais (Pendinas) by Ian Capper
Aberystwyth Penglais (Pendinas) by Ian Capper on https://www.geograph.org.uk

Aberystwyth the cosmopolitan town which retains its Welsh character

Aberystwyth is unique because it retains its Welsh character, with half the population speaking Welsh, but is at the same time cosmopolitan. We have welcomed Syrian refugees here and they love it because of the warm welcome they have received. The mile and a half long promenade is the place to be at sunset and […]

St Mary in the Castle © Jim Linwood
St Mary in the Castle, Hastings © Jim Linwood

Heritage Open Days – England’s unexplored heritage sites at a town near you. Here’s your starter for ten

In early September the doors will be open on hundreds of unusual and exceptional historic and iconic properties. We start you off with some ideas of where to visit around the country.

Arundel Castle © Visual Air
Arundel Castle © Visual Air

Arundel’s Castle overlooking the River Arun, celebrates 950 years of history in 2018

Roger Montgomery built Arundel Castle in the C11th, and it is now one of the oldest and most complete castles in England. It stands in superb grounds which look over the River Arun in West Sussex. And this year it celebrates the 950th anniversary, and today is the family home of the 18th Duke of […]

Castle Warwick by InspiredImages on Pixabay

Warwick, famous for its medieval castle, is a town bursting with character. Its hidden gardens, rich mix of architecture and historic attractions make it a great place for a short break.

Recent excavations at Warwick have found evidence of Neolithic people living in the area. Since then, it was a Saxon settlement, afforded protection to William the Conqueror and his army, and survived The Great Fire of 1694. The town boasts buildings from every period of the last thousand years, even though the Great Fire of […]

Heritage Centre © Shropshire Tourism
Heritage Centre © Shropshire Tourism

Oswestry on the Welsh and English border is an old market town with a turbulent history. The home of Queen Gwinevere, the town is full of folklore and legend.

An ancient market town, Oswestry stands by an Iron Age Hill Fort named Caer Ogyrfan. According to legend, this was the name of King Arthur’s father in law. Gwinevere may have been born here. Of the 25 hill forts on the Welsh borders, this is the largest and is very impressive. The fort shows that […]

High Street © Guildford Borough Council
High Street © Gulidford Borough Council

Historic Guildford in the centre of Surrey has architecture from Saxon times through to the C20th. Enjoy a walk along the tow path by the River Wey, or take a boat trip from Dapdune Wharf.

The early town grew in importance because of its situation on the River Wey. It was a resting place for pilgrims on the medieval Pilgrims Way. Later the town was a coaching stop on the route from London to Portsmouth. The Angel Inn, a medieval timber-framed building on the High Street, remains a hotel to […]