All posts filed under: Grade I listed

The four step Market Cross

Surrounded by beautiful North Dorset countryside, Sturminster Newton lies in the heart of Blackmore Vale.

The town’s name reflects two features of the town: the River Stour, and the Minster. The town, which dates from before the Domesday Book, grew as a market for local agricultural products, especially dairy products. Henry III granted the town a charter for a market in 1219. The market, which closed in 1998 was once […]

Lichfield Cathedral by Stephen Craven

Lichfield, in Staffordshire, the birthplace of Samuel Johnson, lexicographer and ‘a harmless drudge’

Lichfield Cathedral In 669 the missionary, Chad, established Lichfield as the centre of Christianity in Mercia, the greatest kingdom in the land. King Offa, king of Mercia, had the bishop raised to an archbishop. Although, the high status was lost when Offa died. Chad founded the Cathedral in the same year when he became the […]

Chester Cathedral Rob Farrow

Chester in Cheshire steeped in architecture and archaeology

The Romans founded Chester in the C1st AD. The city was the fortress of the 20th Legion. There are extensive Roman walls of local red sandstone. Outside the walls are the remains of the largest Roman amphitheatre in Britain. Storyhouse Today’s theatre lovers can also enjoy an indoor experience at Chester’s Storyhouse. The recently opened […]

Ely by edubarros on Pixabay
Ely by edubarros on Pixabay

Historic Ely, home of Oliver Cromwell

Ely in Cambridgeshire, takes its name from its history of trading in eels. Set in marshes, the Fens, eels were for many years the mainstay of the local economy. If you are interested in the life cycle of the eel then follow the Eel Trail. This self-guided circular tour connects 5 pieces of art which […]

Heritage Centre © Shropshire Tourism
Heritage Centre © Shropshire Tourism

Oswestry on the Welsh and English border is an old market town with a turbulent history. The home of Queen Gwinevere, the town is full of folklore and legend.

An ancient market town, Oswestry stands by an Iron Age Hill Fort named Caer Ogyrfan. According to legend, this was the name of King Arthur’s father in law. Gwinevere may have been born here. Of the 25 hill forts on the Welsh borders, this is the largest and is very impressive. The fort shows that […]

Portsmouth by 921563 on Pixabay
Portsmouth by 921563 on Pixabay

The city of Portsmouth, with its historic dockyard, proud home of HMS Victory, is a vibrant and popular destination which blends the old and the new.

At the entrance to the Harbour, The Point and the Camber, visitor to Portsmouth will find some of the oldest, and many listed, buildings. In 1180 a wealthy merchant founded a chapel. In time it became the Parish church for the settlement which grew around the Point and Camber, Portmouth. Richard I granted the town […]

Lavenham Suffolk by MemoryCatcher on Pixabay
Lavenham Suffolk by MemoryCatcher on Pixabay

Visit Lavenham, a Suffolk wool town, to find a treasure chest of medieval timbered buildings. In its heyday it was one of the wealthiest settlements in England.

The history of Lavenham is one of gains and losses. In 1524 the village, a successful wool settlement, paid more in taxes than either Lincoln or York. Yet, 500 years later in 1824 the village was struggling with poverty. Today, it has recovered and is one of the best preserved medieval English villages. Lavenham in […]

Briggate Leeds © Hannah
Briggate Leeds © Hannah

Enjoy a huge slice of British history in the bustling City of Leeds in West Yorkshire

Leeds has more listed buildings than any other city outside London. The built heritage here is one to marvel at and enjoy. For a slice of British history the city has plenty to offer. It has a number of nearby historic houses, including Harewood House and Temple Newsam. While Kirkstall Abbey, is one of the […]

St Mary's Chepstow showing the town, the Castle and the 1816 bridge© John Burrows
Chepstow © John Burrows

Chepstow has always been a forward looking, modern town. At the gateway to the Wales Coast Path, you can stand on its Bridge and have one foot in Wales and the other foot in England.

William FitzOsbern, cousin of William the Conqueror, founded the Castle, Priory, and Town at Chepstow. He was joint 2nd in command of the Normans in the Norman conquest of 1066. So afterward, William I made him Earl of Hereford. Chepstow Castle The priority for both the Conqueror and FitzOsbern was to secure the English-Welsh border. […]

Saltaire

The UNESCO World Heritage site of Saltaire is four miles from Bradford and is recognised as one of the best preserved 19th century ‘model villages’ in the world. It provides the chance to see just how the woollen industry worked, and it supported a whole community. The leading industrialist Sir Titus Salt founded the picturesque […]